Skip to main content

How To Run Chrome OS in VirtualBox and Try Out Chrome OS Before Buying a Chromebook


image
With Google’s new Chromebooks out at just $249, many people who once wrote them off as too expensive for their limited functionality are giving them a second look. But will you really find Chrome OS useful?
You can easily run Chrome OS in a VirtualBox virtual machine, although you’ll need to tweak a few settings before it will run properly. Once you have, you can run Chrome OS in a window on your computer.

Getting the Virtual Machine

To run the virtual machine, you’ll first need to download and install VirtualBox.
Once you have, visit Hexxeh’s Chromium OS Vanilla website and download the VirtualBox image for the latest version of Chromium OS.
We’re downloading this from an unofficial website because Google doesn’t provide any official binaries for Chrome OS. Chromium OS is a build of the open-source version of Chrome OS, just as Chromium is the open-source version of the Google Chrome browser.
We’re also using the VirtualBox image because it’s sure to work. While you can try downloading a USB image and booting it on your computer, it’s very possible that it wouldn’t support your computer’s hardware. (If you want to try booting from USB, you should probably download Chromium OS Lime instead. It’s a tweaked build of Chromium OS with more hardware support.)

Running the Virtual Machine

Once the image is downloaded, open the downloaded ZIP file and extract the VDI (VirtualBox Disk Image) file from it.
Open VirtualBox and click the New button to create a new virtual machine.
There’s no Chrome OS option in VirtualBox, but the Linux operating system option should work just fine.
The default 256 MB of RAM is probably a bit low. If you have a decent amount of RAM in your computer, feel free to increase the amount of RAM allocated to Chrome OS.
On the Hard Drive screen, select the Use an existing virtual hard drive file option and browse to the Chrome OS .VDI file you extracted earlier.
You’ll now need to change the network adapter type or Chromium OS won’t be able to access the network and you’ll see a “no networks available” message. To do so, right-click your Chrome OS virtual machine and select Settings.
Click the Network tab and expand the Advanced section. Click the Adapter Type drop-down box and select Intel PRO/1000 MT Desktop (82540EM) in the list.
Click the OK button after changing this setting. You can now boot your new Chrome OS system by double-clicking its entry in your VirtualBox library.

Using Chrome OS

When you start Chrome OS, the mouse won’t work. To make it work, click the Machine menu and select the Disable Mouse Integration option.
You can now click inside the virtual machine’s window to make it grab your mouse cursor. To release the mouse cursor from the virtual machine, press the right Ctrl key. (If you’ve set a different “host key” instead of right Ctrl, it will appear at the bottom-right corner of your virtual machine window.)
Chrome OS will take you through a few screens of setup (press Esc to skip the update check when prompted.) You’ll then be able to sign in with your Google account. If you use the Chrome browser, all your Chrome apps, extensions, and settings will be synced if you sign in. You can also click Browse as Guest to try Chrome OS without signing in. Of course, one of the big advantages of a Chromebook is how well it syncs with your Google account and integrates with Google’s web services, and you’ll lose that if you opt not to sign in.
Chrome OS will start up as if you’d just purchased a Chromebook, although the performance on a real Chromebook will be better than what you’ll get in a virtual machine.
If you haven’t tried Chrome OS in a while, you’ll be a bit surprised by how much it’s changed from the early days. It’s no longer just a full-screen browser. The new Aura interface provides a Windows 7-style taskbar and window management. Apps can run in separate windows, there’s a special app launcher, a system tray settings pop-up, a dedicated Downloads window, and more.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

How to run Android on Windows Mobile Phone

Install Android on your HTC Windows Mobile phone – Guide

Welcome to the official XDANDROID AOSP thread which is dedicated to getting Android running on our beloved HTC devices.
Phhusson: has dedicated most of his time helping users and updating kernel to run Eclair and his work for other msm7k devices. However phhusson is not alone as there are also other members working on this. You can find some of them on http://www.htc-linux.org. I've listed some of the developers i know of that currently are working on and they deserve credits and thanks. We also have to note that before this work done there was quite a substantial number of people starting working on linux for our devices. Without them we may not be where we are today. So respect and credits to everyone involved in working on linux kernel for msm devices.
I am not responsible for any damages or problems your device encounters. The build is relatively safe and shouldn't cause any problems.

This tutorial wil…

How to Remove Windows Genuine Advantage Notifications

Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) notifications occur when your computer hasn't passed the validation test. The validation test can be failed due to being sold a pirated (non-genuine) copy of XP, or because you have changed your XP product key to a software-generated key, or sometimes it just happens for no reason at all. The failed validation installs three types of notifications on your computer: one on the log in screen, one log in timer, and one balloon. It also stops updates from Microsoft and disables your ability to install IE7 and Windows Media Player 11. This solution can get rid of all three notifications, even though you will still not be able to update through Windows Update. You will not be able to download things from Microsoft that requires a valid license either. EditSteps
Delete Method 1 If you have only just installed Windows Genuine Advantage notifications, simply using the system restore function will remove the program. Then refuse to accept the WGA update next tim…

OS Setup (Windows): Installing using the MBR or GPT partition style

Applies To: Windows 8.1 When installing Windows on UEFI-based PCs using Windows Setup, your hard drive partition style must be set up to support either UEFI mode or legacy BIOS-compatibility mode. For example, if you receive the error message: “Windows cannot be installed to this disk. The selected disk is not of the GPT partition style”, it’s because your PC is booted in UEFI mode, but your hard drive is not configured for UEFI mode. You’ve got a few options: Reboot the PC in legacy BIOS-compatibility mode. This option lets you keep the existing partition style. For more info, see Boot to UEFI Mode or Legacy BIOS mode.
Reformat the drive for UEFI by using the GPT partition style. This option lets you use the PC’s UEFI firmware features.

You can do this yourself by reformatting the drive using the instructions below, or if you need to preserve the data, use a third-party utility to convert the drive to GPT format.
Why should I convert my drive? Many PCs now include the ability to use the…